Monday, March 26, 2018

(Student writing) Business Cards (by Motoki)


In Japan, we have a lot of manners relating to business. One example is the business card which is called Meishi. I've already seen that some people use it for business here in New Zealand. However,in Japan,the business card has special importance. It isn't just written states.

In Japan, we use the business card to introduce ourselves for business. then there are some things we need to be careful about because we think of the business card as "ourselves". Therefore take care not to fold, make dirty or write anything on a business card when you receive it. After recieving it, after the the business is finished, we sometimes do write something on it to help us remember a detail. But strictly speaking we shouldn't do this. Also, we keep business cards in a protective case. Above all, Japanese business people always have to be careful to be seen to use the business card in the business scene. It is a sign of respect and professionalism.

(Intermediate) Question Formation



Yesterday I gave my students a "find someone who" task. They did a fantastic job of getting to know each other better and there was no problem with a lot of the language they used in their conversations. BUT....

But I noticed that in almost every case my students didn't actually pay much attention to how they used question forms. They tended to just make a simple statement and then kind of 'turn it into a question' through gesture or a hopeful smile at the other person. 

The task wasn't supposed to be about using question forms - it was about social media - but I ended up spending much of the lesson drilling question forms with them.

WHY are question forms so important?

Flexibility
Interaction
Development
Cohesion
Management
Register / style

Questions help us manage a conversation (steer it, control it - make it GO where we want it to).

If we lack the ability to quickly form questions then it can be really hard to develop the conversation fully. It ends up getting stuck in the mud.


Think of questions as the keys that open the conversations up. Or the crane that lifts you out of the mud.



Mechanics (or Grammar)

I believe we pay insufficient attention to questions. They take many different forms grammatically speaking and there are lots of other things to consider about them, such as how exactly to phrase them, and how to get the most out of them. Grammatically speaking, the more certain you are of how you form questions (in all the different tenses and in relation to all the "types" of questions there are), the more you will be able to have conversations that are flexible, interactive, and linguistically rich.

But it's no only about grammar. Asking questions is above all an attitude and a habit.

A well-known English teacher I once knew always used to ask this at the end of a lesson:

"What questions did you ask today?"

Questions are the secret of learning, communicating, thinking, building knowledge, building relationships. In terms of learning a language they unlock doors which otherwise feel impenetrable.

They also keep you mentally focused and active in a conversation.

And they are NOT actually hard to form. Simply use these words with a ? and they will open many doors:

Who?
When?
What?
Why?
How?
Where?
Which?

And offer words that ask people to enlarge, go into more detail...

Really?
Interesting.
Go on.
Okay.
Yes?
Great.
Perfect.
Nice.
How terrible.
Oh.
And?
So?
Crazy!
Amazing.
No!
You're kidding.
Funny.
Good one.
Good for you.
Of course.
No way!
Ha ha.
Yeah.
Yeah?
Yeah!

Phrases like these are really invitations for more input from the other person.

But to widen the scope we do need to return to grammar. Take a look at the common blocks non-native speakers tend to have in using questions. Do you make some of these mistakes? Watch these two videos and do some grammar exercises to help you out of the mud!

Watch Emma's class:

How long time?

Now Watch Jade's class:

Did you forgotten the keys?




Sunday, March 25, 2018

B1.2 Unit 4 Travel - vocab

S U O I R A L I H L S M C E T
Q N S L E E V E L E S S X F H
O O Q I P O I E T Y R I E N I
N Z O I W T T C U S X T R A G
S H S Y T S A N G A T A V T E
S X L N I S D E O H E B S T H
E C R A S I E U O D B Z O A W
A S E A E N D R T R U R C S T
B Y S A N D A L S M R O H O C
I C I T E I F A P M E Q I I G
D B N D N R D F O X T N D C I
C E R U T C E T I H C R A I T
E O G A O T Y T O Y E S T O L
A N X A X R E D R O B Y R U C
L L I R H T M P C L I F F S N

ABR___D
AR_____CTURE
AU_____IC
B___ER
BU__ET
CLA__IC
C__FFS
C___T
C_______TS
DIS____R
EX________NS
EX______NARY
FAN____IC
HI____OUS
LI_______IGHT
OFF___SON
R____TE
S_____LS
SC____Y
SEA____E
S______LESS
TH___L


Quizlet Quiz:

20 terms

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Email from Amaru





Dear Gabriel,

I'm in my land, in the mountains, chilling with my people, eating all the good food that I missed a lot and speaking the worst Spanish in the world. But I already miss the English, the punctual buses, the clean streets, the civilized people, and of course your classes. In fact, sometimes when I feel nostalgic, I usually enter to gabrielwhiteboard to see what's going on.

About the photos, here are a few of the last day and some of the light house at night. 
I lent my camera to Arthur in the graduation, he didn't understand how to use it, but it doesn't matter, they are cool anyway. Jannis did it better, he understands, he's a swiss guy.

I will send you cool stuff in the future, like photos, stories or videos, maybe they are useful for some activities. Keep teaching and being choice.

All the good vibes,

Amaru. 


Sunday, March 18, 2018

(Advanced Documentary SPIN) HyperNormalisation



HyperNormalisation is a 2016 BBC documentary by British filmmaker Adam Curtis. The film was released on 16 October 2016

Watch:

HyperNormalisation

Sunday, March 11, 2018

(Advanced) Climate Tipping Point


Extracts from Gwynne Dyer: Climate tipping point could be here

 

Pre reading: Match these words with synonyms or definitions:

non-linear   incremental   count on   uncharted territory    Meteorological   Celcius

hemisphere    a wider margin     a periodical rise    droughts   no precedent     fluctuation

to trigger     emissions     pre-industrial    threshold     a surge       CO2

 

gradual      rely on       study of the weather and climate      half of the globe      

a sudden increase   release of gases    18th Century    cause     unknown situation    

a larger amount       prolonged lack of rain       has never occurred before      

a temporary change      limit/boundary    non-sequential      carbon dioxide

standard measurement of temperature      an increase occurring every few years       

 

Task 1. Read and explain what you understand using these quotations:

1. "...it's hardly ever mentioned in the public discussion of climate change"

2. "Alas, most people are wrong."

3. "It may do that - but there may also be a sudden jump" 

 

If you spend a lot of time talking to scientists about climate change, there's one word you'll hear time and time again, and yet it's hardly ever mentioned in the public discussion of climate change. The word is "non-linear".

Most people think of global warming as an incremental thing. Alas, most people are wrong. The climate is a very complex system, and complex systems can change in non-linear ways.

In other words, you cannot count on the average global temperature rising steadily but slowly as we pump more and more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

It may do that - but there may also be a sudden jump in the average global temperature that lands you in a world of hurt. That may be happening now.


Task 2.

1. What does the phrase "non-linear" mean?

2. What reasons are given that climate change may not occur gradually but suddenly?

3. What do you think the writer means by "a world of hurt"? What might happen as a result of sudden climate change?


Task 3.

1. Who is Michel Jarraud?

2. What has happened over 2014, 2015 and 2016?

3. What's the difference between local and global temperature?

4. Why is a fifth of a degree Celcius "a big jump" in average global temperature?

5. What have Meteorologists seen happen over the past 11 months?


"We are moving into uncharted territory with frightening speed," said Michel Jarraud, secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organisation, last November. He was referring to the unprecedented way the warming is now accelerating. The hottest year ever was 2014 - until 2015 beat it by a wide margin; 2016 may beat it by an even wider margin.

It was the hottest January ever - and then the average global temperature in February was a full fifth of a degree Celsius higher than January. That was a huge jump, since the "average global temperature" is an average of all the temperatures over the seas and the land in both the summer hemisphere and the winter hemisphere. It is normally a very stable figure, changing no more than a few hundredths of a degree from year to year.

But March was not only hotter than February, it was hotter by an even wider margin than February was over January.

Indeed, each of the past 11 months has beaten the highest previously recorded average temperature for that month.


Task 4.

1. What is El Nino?

2. Why does El Nino not explain the sudden rise in average global temperature?  (two reasons)

 Some people try to explain this all away by blaming it on El Nino, a periodical rise in the ocean surface temperature in the eastern Pacific that moves the rainfall patterns around worldwide, causing droughts here and floods there. But El Nino is a LOCAL rise in temperature, it does not normally affect the average global temperature much.

The frightening acceleration in the warming in the past three months has no precedent in any El Nino year, or indeed in any previous year. It could be some random short-term fluctuation in average global temperature, but coming on top of the record warming of 2014 and 2015 it feels a lot more like part of a trend.


Task 5.

1. What is 1C?
2. What is Plus 2?
3. What happens after plus 2?
4. How long does the Paris agreement give us to cut or emissions? 
4. What is 1.5C?


Last year the average global temperature hit 1C higher than the pre-industrial average. That is halfway to the plus-two degree level which all the world's Governments have agreed we must never exceed, but at least we got to plus-one slowly, over a period of two centuries.

The plus-two threshold matters because that's when the warming we have already caused triggers effects we cannot control: the loss of the Arctic sea-ice, the melting of the permafrost, and immense releases of CO2 from the warming oceans. After plus-two, we will no longer be able to stop the warming by ending our own greenhouse gas emissions.

Even at the global climate summit in Paris in December, there was still hope we might avoid triggering the effects, because the historic rate of warming would still give us about 25 years to work on cutting our emissions before we reach plus-two. But if the current non-linear surge in warming persists, we could have covered half the remaining distance and reached plus 1.5C by the end of this year.


Discuss:

1. How does the article make you feel?
2. What might the world look like if we reach plus 1.5C by the end of this year?
3. Did you find the article objective? Were the facts presented in a balanced way?

More to talk about here:

Environmental Problems



Saturday, March 10, 2018

Business C+ Unit 25, Unit F05

Unit 25 - Further Negotiations

Image result for to hold all the cards










stance










a walkover










off-putting










a trade-off











to manoeuvre












whilst










to take a rain check










Unit F05 - The Art of Saying Yes Or No









a row (rhymes with "cow")











courteous










to cultivate













partially











to make a concession










a softener










to hedge / hedging










a counter-offer









worthwhile









premises









a lease









bottom line











mild









to escalate












to close a deal










Idioms









a done deal











get down to brass tacks









above board










get the show on the road










to hold all the cards







Image result for get down to brass tacks














B2.2 Unit 4 Vocab Preview (performing arts)




























Choreography



















script

















genre





















to pair up

















Shakespearean drama




















costume designer
















role
















film producer

















plot

















stunt


















symbolism





















to originate

















to classify








Sunday, March 4, 2018

(Upper-Intermediate) The Importance of Culture in the Workplace


Adam Bryant discusses the amorphous nature - but extreme importance - of healthy company culture.

Pre-learn some vocab:

24 terms

Watch:

Adam Bryant: The Importance of Culture in the Workplace




After viewing:

Use these words in the gaps:

deliberate
efficiency
leadership
insights
in terms of
 drivers
tangible
metaphor
X factor
strategy
amorphous

NB: "Silo behaviour" occurs when several departments or groups within an organization do not want to share information or knowledge with other individuals in the same organization. It reduces the organization's _________ and can contribute to a failing corporate culture.


Transcript 

"culture - it's such an amorphous word"

By now I've interviewed more than 300 leaders and I always just listen for patterns and themes that come up during the course of the interviews. And I started hearing a lot of great _______ about culture. And I heard this one expression from one of the CEOs were he said we want to be the largest small company in our space. And I was really intrigued by that. What does that mean? How do you do that? Obviously largest ________ size, smallest in terms of just that start up culture feel, and I just got me thinking about culture and what it means. And the thing about culture it's such an amorphous word. I mean if you've got ten people in front of a white board and said what is culture, you could put 100 things on it and they would all be true because it is such a fuzzy concept.

So, the more I thought about it the more I tried to frame the question in the right way about culture. And I really framed it this way, which is what are the biggest _______ of culture, the things that if done well have an outsized positive impact, and if done badly or not at all have an outsized negative impact? And that was really the question that framed the book. And I just went through millions of words of transcripts looking for the insights that helped answer that question. In terms of why now for this book, I really think that culture is increasingly the __________ that's going to separate companies. Because business is just moving so fast, there's so much disruption in so many industries. And you can have two companies with a similar strategy, similar backing and the one that's going to win is the one with the better culture. A lot of people don't focus on culture though because it is so _________. People tend to focus on _______. They tend to focus on results because you can put the results in a spreadsheet, but culture is really the X factor that's going to drive the results, and I've heard that from a lot of really smart CEOs.

I wrote the book as really a playbook because CEOs just have so many things on their plates. They could do literally 100 different things on any different day. They're responsible for everything and kind of nothing at the same time. And because culture is so amorphous it can be hard for them to figure out well, is this a good use of my time. so that's why I really tried to frame it around the question of what are the biggest drivers so that if they're really focused on these things that they would see an impact, even if it's not super _______, but just to know, based on the experience of hundreds of other CEOs, that this had an impact on their company.

If you're a startup CEO you really have to be thoughtful about culture because you're going to have culture one way or another. It's going to happen on its own and every company's culture is different. It's really the sum total of kind of the DNA of the people in your company. And the _______ that I like to use about culture is that it's sort of like cholesterol. In any organization you're going to have good and bad culture. And just like with cholesterol you're going to have good and bad cholesterol.

The trick is to focus on the things that are really going to boost the good aspects of the culture and make sure that the things that are going to hurt your culture don't creep into your company. And I've heard a lot of really compelling stories about that. I interviewed Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos now with this first company where he is the cofounder. He reached a point where he didn't even want to go to work in the morning. He told this story about how he used to just keep hitting the snooze button because he didn't want to go into work at the company that he founded, and that was pretty remarkable. And that's one of the reasons why he focused so much on culture when he went to Zappos because he just learned that you have to be _______ about it. And there are all sorts of romantic notions about a startup culture, and many of them are true, that sense that we're all in it together, that there's an impact, you know, everybody's kind of picking up an oar and rowing together.

Not all start up cultures are great, and we shouldn't think that they are. There could be a lot of chaos and if the ________ isn't focused on culture then you're going to get the kind of the problems that Tony Hsieh had. But it is important to try to hold onto that start up spark.

(Upper-Intermediate) The Importance of a Company's "Culture"


"Would I want to hang out with these people if we weren't forced to work together?" is a guiding barometer for the Zappos CEO.

Quizlet:

Link the phrases

Watch:

The Importance of a Company's "Culture"

(Advanced) I Have A Dream

Image result for I have a dream


I Have a Dream

(Advanced) How economic inequality harms societies





The higher the GDP of a country the better off its people will be, right? Wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart: real effects on health, lifespan, even such basic values as trust.

Watch:

How economic inequality harms societies


True or false?

1. The average well-being of our societies is not dependent any longer on national income and economic growth.

2. There’s no relationship between child well-being and national income per person.

3. New Zealand is a comparatively equal country.

4. Poorer countries still need to focus on raising the average nation income, but richer countries need to concentrate on even distribution of income.

5. Higher rates of imprisonment are driven by higher crime.

6. In Scandinavian countries, your fathers' income is more important than in less equal countries.

7. Sweden and Japan achieve equality in similar ways.

8. In Japan there are greater differences between incomes than in Sweden.

9. It’s mostly the poor who are affected by inequality.

10. Greater equality makes most difference at the top, but has some benefits at the bottom.

11. The psychosocial effect of inequality is more status insecurity.

12. The correlation of inequality and social problems proves that they are caused by inequality.


Discuss:

"No man is an island." What was Wilkerson trying say with this quote?

Was your country on the graphs? How equal / unequal was it? What kinds of social problems do you see in your country? Are they connected with inequality? Are there other causes?







(Business C+) Unit 34, Partners and Competitors - and some pictures of offices

Look carefully at each office environment.

How has the space been organised? How does it reflect the kind of activity that goes on in the space?

How has the human aspect of things been considered? Would it be a nice environment to work in all the time?

Can you guess which country the office might be in, or what company?


Image result for office in Tokyo



Related image




Related image



Image result for office Auckland
Image result for office malaysia





Image result for Airbnb office Delhi




Image result for office


Image result for office rome



Image result for office  1970s




Image result for office Auckland


Image result for office  1970s



Language:

24 terms